Wednesday, March 18, 2009

On leave.....


Dad on an IBM 1410 Circa 1963/64

I have been "on leave" from this blog for about eight days now. I wish I could say that it was because I was being lazy or because the weather has been nice and boring.

My Dad passed away on Wednesday morning, March 11, 2009. There is a post on here dated March 13, but I preposted it (which is the first time I ever did that) on the 9th.

I have been grieving a lot over the past week but am making progress emotionally and will soon be back to regular posting. My Dad always had a habit of downplaying forecasts for major weather events, especially snow. Living in Huntsville, Alabama, usually that made sense. But, I will never forget how he expected "no accumulation" for the Blizzard of 1993.

On February 28, my Dad made one final forecast against snow. I asked him that night if he thought we would see any accumulating snow. He said "no". We saw snow!

....

I love you Dad!

7 comments:

beaudodson said...

Oh, sorry to hear this news. I hope that you are able to find some peace in the coming days. Sounds like you have some good memories of your dad.

Sorry for your loss...

Beau

Jeff Smith Photography said...

Hey Mike. I am so sorry for your loss. I will be praying for you. If you need anything, holler at me. I lost my dad & best friend in 1995. I am sorry bro...

Jason Boggs said...

I'm sorry to hear about your Dad. I will keep you and your family in my thoughts and prayers. Stay safe.

Jason Boggs from Amarillo...

Dewdrop said...

You know my thoughts are with you, Mike. Offer stands, if I can do anything. Love your weather memories of your dad. Incidentally, when regarding s#@w, I say no, too. :D

Rambling Round said...

Sorry for your loss, Mike. I appreciate you letting your weather fans know.

My dad would forecast the weather from the weather vane on top of the town courthouse and the way the clouds looked. I will never forget that back in the early 1960s, he forecast a "blue norther" and predicted snow. The weather bureau didn't predict it. We ended up with a "blizzard" of about 8 inches in West Central Alabama. Years later, I asked him how he knew, and he said there were dark clouds against a blue sky, and he could tell which way the wind was blowing. He also grew up on a farm and learned how to predict the weather from subtle changes. Of course, he wasn't always accurate, but he did all right!

Mike Wilhelm said...

Thanks everyone. Great story, Rambling Round. Thanks for sharing.

Rick said...

Nice memories Mike...Still got you in my prayers Bro..